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Social Security in Valletta


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Malta's social welfare system is based on a contributory system supported by a non-contributory means tested welfare system. It is funded by taxation, as well as contributions by employers, employees, and self-employed persons.

The Social Security Division of the Maltese government, located in Valletta, is responsible for its administration. Contribution payments are collected by Malta's Income Tax Department, but the funds are administered by the local Social Security authorities. The legal framework of Malta's social security system is laid out in its Social Security Act.

Social Security Division
38 Ordnance Street
Valletta VLT 1021
Telephone: +356 2590 3000
Fax: +356 2590 3231

Contributions

Social security, or national security, contributions in Malta are paid half by the employer, and half by the employee. Contributions are generally 10% of an individual's basic pay, and are collected from employed individuals ages 14 to 65. The State also contributes 50% of the total amount paid by the employer and the employee.

There are basically two classes of social security contributions in Malta:

  • Employed
  • Self-employed individuals

Self-employed individuals pay slightly more than employed persons, given that contributions are normally split between employer and employee.

Class 1

Employees in given wage categories, students, and minors. As of 2013, there are 6 categories of Class 1 contributions:

Category A: Under age 18, earning less than €162/week.

  • Contributions: €6.62/week by employee and employer

Category B: Over age 18, earning less than €162/week

  • Contributions: €16.22/week by employee and employer, or if the employee chooses, 10% of basic weekly wage

Category C:

  • Born up to 31 December 1961, earning between €162 and €339/week
  • Contributions: 10% of weekly wage by employee and employer

  • Born from 1 January 1962 onwards, earning between €162 and €339/week

    Contributions: 10% of weekly wage by employee and employer

Category D:

  • Born up to 31 December 1961, earning more than €339/week
  • Contributions: €33.90/week by employee and employer

  • Born from 1 January 1962 onwards, earning more than €403/week

    Contributions: €40.30/week by employee and employer

Category E: Students (minors) under age 18

  • Contributions: 10% of weekly wage, maximum €4.38/week, by employer and employee

Category F: Students over age 18

  • Contributions: 10% of weekly wage, maximum €7.94/week, by employer and employee

Class 2

Self occupied and self employed persons who derive income of more than €910   from an economic activity but are not employed. As of 2013, contribution rates for Class 2 individuals are:

Born up to 31 December 1961, earns between €9,657 and €17,629

  • Contribution: 15%/week for self employed and self occupied individuals

Born up to 31 December 1961, earns more than €17,630

  • Contribution: €50/week for self employed and self occupied individuals

Born after 1 January 1961, earns between €9,657 and €20,964

  • Contribution: 15%/week for self employed and self occupied individuals

Born after 1 January 1961, earns more than €20,965

  • Contribution: €60/week

Benefits

The social security system in Malta provides child benefits, cost of living bonuses, medical assistance, pensions, short term benefits, and social and unemployment benefits.

To find out what social benefits you may be eligible for, you can use the Maltese Government's online Benefits Finder tool.

Statutory Sick Pay

According to Maltese law and collective agreements, upon presentation of a doctor's certificate, employees are also entitled to wages during illness. The length of entitlement to sick pay depends on how long an employee has been employed.

Sickness insurance benefits

Employers are not obligated to pay wages for absence due to long-term illness. Individuals are entitled to sickness insurance benefits under the Social Security Act in this instance.

To be eligible to receive sickness insurance benefits, you must:

  • Provide a medical certificate from a general practitioner from the first day of sickness.
  • Be re-examined by a physician weekly. After 60 days of providing medical certificates and receiving benefits, the individual is examined by a medical panel to determine whether sickness benefits are still warranted.
  • Have paid social security contributions for at least 50 weeks, 20 of which have been in the last 2 years.

Parental (Maternity/Paternity) Leave and Pay

Employees in Malta may apply for paid parental (maternity/paternity) leave for an uninterrupted period of up to 14 weeks. At least 4 weeks notice must be given to the employer before the commencement of this period.

Six weeks of this 14-week period must be taken following the birth of a child/children. Four weeks of this 14-week period may be taken immediately prior to the birth of a child/children. The remaining weeks of maternity leave may be added on to either of these periods.

In the private sector, unpaid parental leave may be granted to both men and women for the purpose of caring for a child following birth, adoption, or legal custody. Leave is grated for a period of up to three months, until the child is 8 years old.

In the public sector, unpaid parental leave may be granted to both men and women for the purpose of caring for a child following birth, adoption, or legal custody. Leave is granted for a period of up to 1 year per child, or a one-time period of up to 5 years. In the public sector, both parents may also share (i.e. split) parental leave times.

National Insurance Number/Social Security Number

A national insurance number issued by Malta's Social Security Department is needed for social benefits payments.

You can apply for a national insurance number by filling out this application form and returning it to the Maltese Social Security Office at social.security@gov.mt.

Update 26/05/2013


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